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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. government is going over the fiscal cliff, even as senate republicans and the white house reported progress had been made, but house republicans say they will not vote on anything tonight. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on today's developments, including an update from todd zwillich of public radio international, who's been tracking the story on the hill. >> woodruff: then, as secretary of state hillary clinton is hospitalized with a blood clot, we examine their causes and possible treatments. >> suarez: margaret warner talks to jonathan martin and glenn thrush of politico. their new e-book focuses on the crucial final month of the presidential race between barack obama and mitt romney. test. >> barack obama didn't perform that well until late and romney didn't perform the campaign well. campaign management is more important than an individual candidate's performance. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> w
year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the senate's republican minority leader mitch mcconnell. and those contacts continued today. by early this afternoon amid reports of progress, president obama emerged in a campaign style setting. >> today it appears that an agreement to prevent this new year's tax hike is within sight. but it's to the done. there are still issues left to resolve. but we're hopeful that congress can get it done. but
in the fiscal cliff crisis. house republicans agree to meet sunday night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry
on new year's eve and they say if we go over the so-called fiscal cliff, take all the tax votes you want, they're all tax cut votes. and conservative republicans believe their bargaining position improves. you reported on the debt limit but that becomes more of a concern as february approaches. they think they have leverage there to come bean the debt limit with the debate over more spending cut and more leverage on what they want from taxes. so there are strong voices on both sides so they say go over. >> warner: we better fasten our seat belts. ed to >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": a ban on adoptions from russia; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the
on the senate to come up with a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. with prospects still murky for a deal before year's end, what can government workers, wall street investors and taxpayers expect if lawmakers miss the deadline? for that, we turn to stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy. jackie simon, public policy director of the american federation of government employees. and hugh johnson, who runs an investment and advisory firm in albany, new york. you all represent different constituencies. i want to start with you, jackie. -- sorry, i want to start with you, stacy, and talk about philanthropy. this is the end of the year when people are making their decisions about whether they're going to get tax breaks or who they're going to give to. are people looking at the fiscal cliff and saying "i don't know"? >> absolutely. people are uncertain as to whether there's going to be a charitable deduction next year, things like the estate tax will change. so it's a rocky time. so some people are giving more and deciding "i'm going to get the tax break now and do it while it's a good th
before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middle class but raising tax rates on incomes over 250,000 dollars a year. president also wants to extend unemployment benefits for some 2 million americans who will lose them in the new year. and a proposal would delay any spending cuts. the president asked for an up or down vote on his plan unless there is a counter proposal that will pass both the house and senate. a little more than an hour after the meeting began, several pa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)